Decreased central mu-opioid receptor availability in fibromyalgia.

Harris RE, Clauw DJ, Scott DJ, McLean SA, Gracely RH, Zubieta JK.

Department of Internal Medicine, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA. reharris@med.umich.edu

The underlying neurophysiology of acute pain is fairly well characterized, whereas the central mechanisms operative in chronic pain states are less well understood. Fibromyalgia (FM), a common chronic pain condition characterized by widespread pain, is thought to originate largely from altered central neurotransmission. We compare a sample of 17 FM patients and 17 age- and sex-matched healthy controls, using mu-opioid receptor (MOR) positron emission tomography. We demonstrate that FM patients display reduced MOR binding potential (BP) within several regions known to play a role in pain modulation, including the nucleus accumbens, the amygdala, and the dorsal cingulate. MOR BP in the accumbens of FM patients was negatively correlated with affective pain ratings. Moreover, MOR BP throughout the cingulate and the striatum was also negatively correlated with the relative amount of affective pain (McGill, affective score/sensory score) within these patients. These findings indicate altered endogenous opioid analgesic activity in FM and suggest a possible reason for why exogenous opiates appear to have reduced efficacy in this population.

PMID: 17855614 [PubMed – in process]

1: J Neurosci. 2007 Sep 12;27(37):10000-6.

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Folllowing Rick Usher's death in December 2008, at his request in September of that year, I had agreed, as his principal contributor and an experienced journalist, to run the FMS Global News service due to his heavy commitments to music and raising research funds through this avenue. Following his sad and sudden death I hope to continue his work as he would have wished.
This entry was posted in Fibrohugs News, Fibromyalgia Blogs, Fibromyalgia News, FM, FMS Global News, Global News, News, Pain, University of Michigan. Bookmark the permalink.

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