Feeling bad in more ways than one: comorbidity patterns of medically unexplained and psychiatric conditions.

1: J Gen Intern Med. 2007 Jun;22(6):818-21

Schur EA, Afari N, Furberg H, Olarte M, Goldberg J, Sullivan PF, Buchwald D.
Department of Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA, USA. ellschur@u.washington.edu

BACKGROUND: Considerable overlap in symptoms and disease comorbidity has been noted among medically unexplained and psychiatric conditions seen in the primary care setting, such as chronic fatigue syndrome, low back pain, irritable bowel syndrome, chronic tension headache, fibromyalgia, temporomandibular joint disorder, major depression, panic attacks, and posttraumatic stress disorder.

OBJECTIVE: To examine interrelationships among these 9 conditions.

DESIGN: Using data from a cross-sectional survey, we described associations and used latent class analysis to investigate complex interrelationships.

PARTICIPANTS: 3,982 twins from the University of Washington Twin Registry.

MEASUREMENTS: Twins self-reported a doctor’s diagnosis of the conditions.

RESULTS: Comorbidity among these 9 conditions far exceeded chance expectations; 31 of 36 associations were significant. Latent class analysis yielded a 4-class solution. Class I (2% prevalence) had high frequencies of each of the 9 conditions. Class II (8% prevalence) had high proportions of multiple psychiatric diagnoses. Class III (17% prevalence) participants reported high proportions of depression, low back pain, and headache. Participants in class IV (73% prevalence) were generally healthy. Class I participants had the poorest markers of health status.

CONCLUSIONS: These results support theories suggesting that medically unexplained conditions share a common etiology. Understanding patterns of comorbidity can help clinicians care for challenging patients.

PMID: 17503107 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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Folllowing Rick Usher's death in December 2008, at his request in September of that year, I had agreed, as his principal contributor and an experienced journalist, to run the FMS Global News service due to his heavy commitments to music and raising research funds through this avenue. Following his sad and sudden death I hope to continue his work as he would have wished.
This entry was posted in Autoimmune Diseases, Awareness, Back Pain, Boston, Britain, British, Central Nervous System, Chronic Fatigue, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic Insomnia, Chronic Multisymptom Illness, Chronic Myofacial Pain, Chronic Pain, Chronic Pain Disorders, Chronic Widespread Pain, Clinical, Clinical Pain, Clinical Trials, Diseases, Dysfunctional Pain Processing, Europe, Fatigue, Feeds, Fibrohugs, Fibrohugs News, Fibromyalgia, Fibromyalgia Blogs, Fibromyalgia News, Fibromyalgia News Belgium, Fibromyalgia News Deutschland, Fibromyalgia News France, Fibromyalgia News Israel, Fibromyalgia News Italy, Fibromyalgia News Japan, Fibromyalgia News Jerusalem, Fibromyalgia News Korea, Fibromyalgia News Southeast Asia, Fibromyalgia News Turkey, Fibromyalgia News Wisconsin, Fibromyalgia Press Releases, Fibromyalia News Germany, FMS Global News, Global News, Health, Health Care, Health Insurance, Healthcare Quality, IBS, Invisible Illness, Invisible Illnesses, Low Back Pain, Medical, Medical Journals, Medical Research, Medical University, Multiple Chemical Sensitivity, Myofacial Pain Syndrome, Neurotransmitters, News, News Australia, News Belgium, News Canada, News France, News India, News Ireland, News Israel, News Italy, News Japan, News Jerusalem, News Korea, News Montreal, News Nigeria, News Norway, News Quebec, News Saskatchewan, News Scotland, News Southeast Asia, News Spain, News Sweden, News Toronto, News Turkey, News UK, News Wisconsin, Nigeria, North Carolina, Ontario, Osteoarthritis, Ottawa, Pain, Pain Management, Pain Management Clinic, Pain Matrix, Philadelphia, Poor Sleep, Rehabilitation, Research, Rheumatism, Rheumatoid Arthritis, RSS, Seattle, Sleep Disorders, Sleep Disturbance, Sleep Quality, Southeast Asia, Statistics, Stockholm, Surrey and Sussex, Swedish, Syndromes, Temporomandibular Joint Disorders, Tenderpoints, The Netherlands., Therapies, TMJ, Toronto, Universities, US, Virginia, Washington DC, World, World News, World Wide. Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Feeling bad in more ways than one: comorbidity patterns of medically unexplained and psychiatric conditions.

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