Imaging pain of fibromyalgia.

1: Curr Pain Headache Rep. 2007 Jun;11(3):190-200.

Cook DB, Stegner AJ, McLoughlin MJ.
William S.

Middleton Memorial Veterans Hospital, Madison, WI 53706; Department of Kinesiology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706, USA. dcook@education.wisc.edu.

Brain imaging studies have provided objective evidence of abnormal central regulation of pain in fibromyalgia (FM). Resting brain blood flow studies have reported mixed findings for several brain regions, whereas decreased thalamic blood flow has been noted by several investigators. Studies examining the function of the nociceptive system in FM have reported augmented brain responses to both painful and non-painful stimuli that may be influenced by psychologic dispositions such as depressed mood and catastrophizing. Treatment approaches are beginning to demonstrate the potential for brain imaging to improve our understanding of pain-alleviating mechanisms. Data from other chronic conditions suggest that idiopathic pain may be maintained by similar central abnormalities as in FM, whereas chronic pain conditions with a known nociceptive source may not be. Future neuroimaging research in FM is clearly warranted and should continue to improve our understanding of factors involved in pain maintenance and symptom exacerbation.

PMID: 17504646 [PubMed – in process]

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Folllowing Rick Usher's death in December 2008, at his request in September of that year, I had agreed, as his principal contributor and an experienced journalist, to run the FMS Global News service due to his heavy commitments to music and raising research funds through this avenue. Following his sad and sudden death I hope to continue his work as he would have wished.
This entry was posted in Arthritis, Article, Autoimmune Diseases, Britain, Chronic Fatigue, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic Insomnia, Chronic Multisymptom Illness, Chronic Myofacial Pain, Chronic Pain, Chronic Pain Disorders, Chronic Widespread Pain, Clinical, Clinical Pain, Diseases, Dysfunctional Pain Processing, Europe, Fatigue, Feeds, Fibrohugs, Fibrohugs News, Fibromyalgia, Fibromyalgia Blogs, Fibromyalgia News, Fibromyalgia News Belgium, Fibromyalgia News Deutschland, Fibromyalgia News France, Fibromyalgia News Israel, Fibromyalgia News Italy, Fibromyalgia News Japan, Fibromyalgia News Jerusalem, Fibromyalgia News Korea, Fibromyalgia News Southeast Asia, Fibromyalgia News Turkey, Fibromyalgia News Wisconsin, Fibromyalgia Press Releases, Fibromyalia News Germany, FMS Global News, Global News, Health, Invisible Illnesses, Medical, Medical Insurance, Medical Journals, Medical Research, Medical University, Multiple Chemical Sensitivity, Myofacial Pain Syndrome, Neurotransmitters, News, News Australia, News Belgium, News Canada, News France, News India, News Ireland, News Israel, News Italy, News Japan, News Jerusalem, News Korea, News Montreal, News Nigeria, News Norway, News Quebec, News Saskatchewan, News Scotland, News Spain, News Sweden, News Turkey, News UK, News Wisconsin, Nigeria, North Carolina, Ontario, Osteoarthritis, Ottawa, Pain, Pain Management, Pain Management Clinic, Pain Matrix, Palliative Care, Philadelphia, Physiology, Poor Sleep, Preventive Medicine, Research, Rheumatism, Rheumatoid Arthritis, RSS, Sleep Disorders, Sleep Disturbance, Sleep Quality, Statistics, Stockholm, Surrey and Sussex, Swedish, Tenderpoints, Toronto, Universities, US, Virginia, Washington DC, World, World News, World Wide. Bookmark the permalink.

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