Abnormal brain processing of affective and sensory pain descriptors in chronic pain patients.

Sitges C, Garcia-Herrera M, Pericas M, Collado D, Truyols M, Montoya P.

Department of Psychology, University of Balearic Islands, Spain; Research Institute on Health Sciences (IUNICS), Palma, Spain.

OBJECTIVE: Previous research has suggested that chronic pain patients might be particularly vulnerable to the effects of negative mood during information processing. However, there is little evidence for abnormal brain processing of affective and sensory pain-related information in chronic pain. Behavioral and brain responses, to pain descriptors and pleasant words, were examined in chronic pain patients and healthy controls during a self-endorsement task. METHODS: Eighteen patients with fibromyalgia (FM), 18 patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain due to identifiable physical injury (MSK), and 16 healthy controls were asked to decide whether word targets described their current or past experience of pain. The number of self-endorsed words, elapsed time to endorse the words, and event-related potentials (ERPs) elicited by words, were recorded. RESULTS: Data revealed that chronic pain patients used more affective and sensory pain descriptors, and were slower in responding to self-endorsed pain descriptors than to pleasant words. In addition, it was found that affective pain descriptors elicited significantly more enhanced positive ERP amplitudes than pleasant words in MSK pain patients; whereas sensory pain descriptors elicited greater positive ERP amplitudes than affective pain words in healthy controls. CONCLUSIONS: These data support the notion of abnormal information processing in chronic pain patients, which might be characterized by a lack of dissociation between sensory and affective components of pain-related information, and by an exaggerated rumination over word meaning during the encoding of self-referent information about pain.

PMID: 17434596 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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Folllowing Rick Usher's death in December 2008, at his request in September of that year, I had agreed, as his principal contributor and an experienced journalist, to run the FMS Global News service due to his heavy commitments to music and raising research funds through this avenue. Following his sad and sudden death I hope to continue his work as he would have wished.
This entry was posted in Analgesics, Article, Autoimmune Diseases, Awareness, Back Pain, Britain, Chronic Fatigue, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic Insomnia, Chronic Multisymptom Illness, Chronic Myofacial Pain, Chronic Pain, Clinical, Clinical Pain, Diseases, Drugs, Europe, Feeds, Fibrohugs, Fibrohugs News, Fibromyalgia, Fibromyalgia News, Fibromyalgia News Deutschland, Fibromyalgia News France, Fibromyalgia News Israel, Fibromyalgia News Jerusalem, Fibromyalgia News Korea, Fibromyalgia News Southeast Asia, Fibromyalia News Germany, FMS Global News, Global News, Health, Hypersensitivity, Invisible Illness, Medical, Medical Journals, Medical Research, Medical University, Multiple Chemical Sensitivity, Myofacial Pain Syndrome, Narcotics, News, News Australia, News Canada, News France, News India, News Ireland, News Israel, News Jerusalem, News Korea, News Montreal, News Norway, News Quebec, News Saskatchewan, News Scotland, News Spain, News Sweden, News UK, North Carolina, Ontario, Ontario Research and Development, Ottawa, Pain, Pain Management, Pain Management Clinic, Pain Matrix, Pharmacologic, Pharmacological, Philadelphia, Physiology, Research, RSS, Sleep Disorders, Stockholm, Swedish, Tenderpoints, Therapies, Toronto, Universities, US, Virginia, World, World News, World Wide, Worldwide. Bookmark the permalink.

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