New sleep studies show effects of lack of sleep in men and women

Contact: Jim Arcuri
jarcuri@aasmnet.org
708-492-0930
American Academy of Sleep Medicine

New study in SLEEP finds that sleep disturbance increases spontaneous pain in women
WESTCHESTER, Ill. — Sleep continuity disturbance impairs endogenous pain-inhibitory function and increases spontaneous pain in women. This supports a possible pathophysiologic role of sleep disturbance in chronic pain, according to a study published in the April 1st issue of the journal SLEEP.

The study, conducted by Michael T. Smith, PhD, and colleagues at John’s Hopkins University, focused on 32 healthy females, who were studied polysomnographically for seven nights. On the first two nights, the subjects slept undisturbed for eight hours. Then, the women were assigned to one of three groups: “Control”, “Forced Awakening” (FA) and “Restricted Sleep Opportunity” (RSO). From nights three-to-five, the “Control” group continued to sleep undisturbed, while the “Forced Awakening” group underwent eight forced awakenings, one per hour, and the “Restricted Sleep Opportunity” group received partial sleep deprivation by delayed bedtime. On night six, both the FA and RSO groups underwent 36 hours of total sleep deprivation, followed by 11-hour recovery sleep.

In an assessment of the subjects’ completion of twice-daily psychophysical assessments of mechanical pain thresholds and pain inhibition, it was discovered that the FA group demonstrated an increase in spontaneous pain, while neither the “Control” nor the RSO group showed changes in pain inhibition or spontaneous pain during partial sleep deprivation.

“This study finds that fragmented sleep profiles, akin to individuals suffering from middle of the night insomnia, health care workers on call, and parents caring for infants, alter natural systems that regulate and control pain, and can lead to spontaneous painful symptoms,” said Smith. “Our research shows that disrupted sleep, marked by multiple prolonged awakenings, impairs natural pain control mechanisms that are thought to play a key role in the development, maintenance, and exacerbation of chronic pain.”

Recent studies associate lack of sleep with serious health problems such as an increased risk of depression, obesity, cardiovascular disease and diabetes.

Experts recommend that adults get between seven and eight hours of sleep each night to maintain good health and optimum performance.

Those who think they might have a sleep disorder are urged to discuss their problem with their primary care physician, who will issue a referral to a sleep specialist.

###
SLEEP is the official journal of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC, a joint venture of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) and the Sleep Research Society.

SleepEducation.com, a Web site maintained by the AASM, provides information about the various sleep disorders that exist, the forms of treatment available, recent news on the topic of sleep, sleep studies that have been conducted and a listing of sleep facilities.

For a copy of this article, entitled, “The Effects of Sleep Deprivation on Pain Inhibition and Spontaneous Pain in Women”, or to arrange an interview with an AASM spokesperson regarding this study, please contact Jim Arcuri, public relations coordinator, at (708)492-0930, ext. 9317, or jarcuri@aasmnet.org.

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Contact: Jim Arcuri
jarcuri@aasmnet.org
708-492-0930
American Academy of Sleep Medicine

Sleep quantity affects morning testosterone levels in older men
WESTCHESTER, Ill. — The testosterone levels of healthy men decline as they get older. As sleep quality and quantity typically decrease with age, objectively measured differences in the amount of sleep a healthy older man gets can affect his level of testosterone in the morning, according to a study published in the April 1st issue of the journal SLEEP.

The study, conducted by Plamen Penev, MD, PhD, of the University of Chicago, focused on 12 healthy men between the ages of 64 and 74. Three morning blood samples were pooled for the measurement of total and free testosterone. In addition to overnight laboratory polysomnography, wrist activity monitoring for six-to-nine days were used to determine the amount of nighttime sleep of the participants in everyday life settings.

The main outcome levels were total sleep time and morning testosterone levels. Analyses revealed that the amount of nighttime sleep measured by polysomnography was an independent predictor of the subjects’ morning total and free testosterone levels.

“The results of the study raise the possibility that older men who obtain less actual sleep during the night have lower blood testosterone levels in the morning,” said Penev. “Although the findings suggest that how long a person sleeps may be an indicator of age-related changes in important hormone signals in the body, future studies are needed to determine the importance of these relationships for the health of older adults.”

Recent studies associate lack of sleep with serious health problems such as an increased risk of depression, obesity, cardiovascular disease and diabetes.

Experts recommend that adults get between seven and eight hours of sleep each night to maintain good health and optimum performance.

Those who think they might have a sleep disorder are urged to discuss their problem with their primary care physician, who will issue a referral to a sleep specialist.

###
SLEEP is the official journal of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC, a joint venture of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) and the Sleep Research Society.

SleepEducation.com, a Web site maintained by the AASM, provides information about the various sleep disorders that exist, the forms of treatment available, recent news on the topic of sleep, sleep studies that have been conducted and a listing of sleep facilities.

For a copy of this article, entitled, “Association Between Sleep and Morning Testosterone Levels in Older Men”, or to arrange an interview with an AASM spokesperson regarding this study, please contact Jim Arcuri, public relations coordinator, at (708)492-0930, ext. 9317, or jarcuri@aasmnet.org.
 

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Folllowing Rick Usher's death in December 2008, at his request in September of that year, I had agreed, as his principal contributor and an experienced journalist, to run the FMS Global News service due to his heavy commitments to music and raising research funds through this avenue. Following his sad and sudden death I hope to continue his work as he would have wished.
This entry was posted in Article, Awareness, Chronic Fatigue, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic Insomnia, Chronic Multisymptom Illness, Chronic Myofacial Pain, Chronic Pain, Clinical, Clinical Pain, Diseases, Europe, Feeds, Fibrohugs, Fibrohugs News, Fibromyalgia, Fibromyalgia News, Fibromyalgia News Deutschland, Fibromyalgia News Korea, Fibromyalia News Germany, FMS Global News, Global News, Health, Invisible Illness, Medical, Myofacial Pain Syndrome, News, News Australia, News Canada, News India, News Ireland, News Korea, News Norway, News Scotland, News Sweden, News UK, North Carolina, Ontario, Pain, Pain Management, Pain Matrix, Physiology, Research, RSS, Sleep Disorders, Stockholm, Swedish, Tenderpoints, Therapies, Toronto, US, Virginia, World, World News, World Wide, Worldwide. Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to New sleep studies show effects of lack of sleep in men and women

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